Uber may be based in the Golden State, but it’s increasingly under more scrutiny by the state’s agencies. First, the California Labor Commission found that one of its drivers was, in fact an employee, not a contractor, and was entitled to all the benefits of a full-timer.

Now the California Public Utilities Commission hit the ride-sharing service with a $7.3 million fine for not providing details about its drivers, riders, the kinds of rides it was giving. The company is also being sued for not providing equal access to disabled riders, with reports of its drivers refusing service to riders with service dogs and those in wheelchairs.

The regulatory body stated, “In adopting these reporting requirements, the CPUC intended to gather information necessary to its oversight of TNCs (transportation network company) on behalf of the riding public: whether TNC services are being provided in a nondiscriminatory manner enabling equal access to all, and whether TNC services are being provided in a manner that promotes public safety.”

Lyft and Sidecar, Uber’s competitors in the rideshare space, were given the same requests and both the companies provided the information that was requested.

The CPUC threatened to shut down ride share companies because of rides given to and from the airports in the state. The company’s also had its commercial carpooling services declared illegal by the government body.

Via re/code. Image via Uber.

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